Lexi Carver | March 12, 2014

Have you ever wondered why boaters wear polarized sunglasses? It’s because sunlight reflecting off the water is primarily polarized in one direction, and polarized sunglasses will block this component of the reflected light, thus reducing glare. To understand why this is, we can use COMSOL software. This example solves the governing Maxwell’s equations using the RF Module or Wave Optics Module to simulate light incident at an angle upon a dielectric medium, and the solution shows agreement with analytic solutions.

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Nancy Bannach | March 11, 2014

A lot of materials have anisotropic properties and, in many cases, the anisotropy follows the shape of the material. COMSOL Multiphysics offers different methods for defining curvilinear coordinate systems. Here, we discuss the concepts of each and when to use which method.

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Amelia Halliday | March 10, 2014

There are several techniques out there for saving memory when solving a model. One involves splitting it into separate sections and solving these individually, instead of the entire model at once. If you want to map data from one COMSOL Multiphysics® solution to the next using MATLAB® scripting, you can do so by connecting the two software programs via LiveLink™ for MATLAB®.

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Henrik Sönnerlind | March 7, 2014

Buckling instability is a treacherous phenomenon in structural engineering, where a small increase in the load can lead to a sudden catastrophic failure. In this blog post, we will investigate some classes of buckling problems and how they can be analyzed.

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Jan-Philipp Weiss | March 6, 2014

Previously in this blog series, my colleague Pär described parallel numerical simulations with COMSOL Multiphysics on shared and distributed memory platforms. Today, we discuss the combination of these two methods: hybrid computing. I will try to shed some light onto the various aspects of hybrid computing and modeling, and show how COMSOL Multiphysics can use hybrid configurations in order to squeeze out the best performance on parallel platforms.

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Marc Fernandez Silva | March 5, 2014

Being able to compute the spatial gradients of the magnetic field or magnetic flux density is needed in areas such as radiology, magnetophoresis, and geophysics. One of the most important applications is in the design of magnetic resonance imaging machines, where it’s important to analyze not only the field strength, but also the spatial variation of the field. Today’s blog will demonstrate how to compute and plot the gradients of the magnetic field in 3D electromagnetic simulations in COMSOL Multiphysics.

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Gerard Hegemans | March 4, 2014

Cars come with either an automatic gearbox or a manually operated one, a stick shift. With a manual gearbox, we use the stick shifter very frequently while driving the car, yet we hardly ever think about the way the mechanism works. Here, we investigate how it works and what forces are acting on it when submitted to a very common load case — selecting first gear — with the help of a COMSOL Multibody Dynamics model of the gearshift mechanism.

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Mark Fowler | March 3, 2014

Polymer electrolyte membrane or proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells provide a potentially clean and portable source of power. This is of major interest to the transport industry as well as for power generation at fixed sites. COMSOL Multiphysics is a powerful simulation tool you can use to help understand and overcome PEM fuel cell design and construction challenges.

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Mads Herring Jensen | February 28, 2014

Previously, we introduced the theory behind thermoacoustics. Here, I will go deeper into modeling acoustics with the Thermoacoustic interface in COMSOL Multiphysics and show you some tips and tricks on how to do this.

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Mads Herring Jensen | February 27, 2014

When sound propagates in structures and geometries with small dimensions, the sound waves become attenuated because of thermal and viscous losses. More specifically, the losses occur in the acoustic thermal and viscous boundary layers near the walls. This is a known phenomenon that needs to be included when studying and simulating systems affected by these losses in order to model these systems correctly and to match measurements.

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Ahsan Munir | February 26, 2014

DNA is a complex molecule that contains instructions for life and often referred to as a “digital fingerprint” or code telling a cell what to do. DNA is often the only means for accurate testing and identification of biomolecules, cells, or even an entire person during forensic investigations. The need to be able to test for DNA, as quickly as possible, and even at the site where the sample is taken, is becoming more and more important.

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